2016-2017 Graduate Catalog


Nursing Practice - Anesthesia, DNP-A

Description of Program

The Doctor of Nursing Practice-Anesthesia (DNP-A) is an innovative, solutions-focused program designed to prepare nurse anesthesia students for solving complex healthcare issues and developing new healthcare opportunities, specifically in the context of nurse anesthesia practice. The program builds on TCU's mission - "Learning to Change the World" - and charges post-baccalaureate registered nurse DNP-A students with "Making a Difference in Healthcare".

Mission

The DNP-A provides the terminal academic preparation for nurse anesthesia practice with advanced, specialized knowledge and skills to meet the health needs of diverse populations. The purpose of the DNP-A program is to prepare nurse anesthetists who are equipped to assume clinical leadership positions in a variety of healthcare, business, government and educational organizations.

Objectives

Upon completion of the DNP-A curriculum, graduates should be able to:

Patient Safety

  1. Be vigilant in the delivery of patient care.
  2. Refrain from engaging in extraneous activities that abandon or minimize vigilance while providing direct patient care (e.g., texting, reading, emailing, etc.).
  3. Conduct a comprehensive equipment check.
  4. Protect patients from iatrogenic complications.

Perianesthesia

  1. Provide individualized care throughout the perianesthesia continuum.
  2. Deliver culturally competent perianesthesia care.
  3. Provide anesthesia services to all patients across the lifespan.
  4. Perform a comprehensive history and physical assessment.
  5. Administer general anesthesia to patients with a variety of physical conditions.
  6. Administer general anesthesia for a variety of surgical and medically related procedures.
  7. Administer and manage a variety of regional anesthetics.
  8. Maintain current certification in ACLS and PALS.

Critical Thinking

  1. Apply knowledge to practice in decision-making and problem solving.
  2. Provide nurse anesthesia services based on evidence-based principles.
  3. Perform a preanesthetic assessment before providing anesthesia services.
  4. Assume responsibility and accountability for diagnosis.
  5. Formulate an anesthesia plan of care before providing anesthesia services.
  6. Identify and take appropriate action when confronted with anesthetic equipment-related malfunctions.
  7. Interpret and utilize data obtained from noninvasive and invasive monitoring modalities.
  8. Calculate, initiate, and manage fluid and blood component therapy.
  9. Recognize, evaluate, and manage the physiological responses coincident to the provision of anesthesia services.
  10. Recognize and appropriately manage complications that occur during the provision of anesthesia services.
  11. Use science-based theories and concepts to analyze new practice approaches.
  12. Pass the national certification examination (NCE) administered by NBCRNA.

 Communication

  1. Utilize interpersonal and communication skills that result in the effective exchange of information and collaboration with patients and their families.
  2. Utilize interpersonal and communication skills that result in an effective interprofessional exchange of information and collaboration with other healthcare professionals.
  3. Respect the dignity and privacy of patients while maintaining confidentiality in the delivery of interprofessional care.
  4. Maintain comprehensive, timely, accurate and legible healthcare records.
  5. Transfer the responsibility for care of the patient to other qualified providers in a manner that assures continuity of care and patient safety.
  6. Teach others.

Leadership

  1. Integrate critical and reflective thinking in his or her leadership approach.
  2. Provide leadership that facilitates intraprofessional and interprofessional collaboration. Professional Role The graduate must demonstrate the ability to:

Professional Role

  1. Adhere to the Code of Ethics for the Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist.
  2. Interact on a professional level with integrity.
  3. Apply ethically sound decision-making processes.
  4. Function within legal and regulatory requirements.
  5. Accept responsibility and accountability for his or her practice.
  6. Provide anesthesia services to patients in a cost-effective manner.
  7. Demonstrate knowledge of wellness and chemical dependency in the anesthesia profession through completion of content in wellness and chemical dependency.
  8. Inform the public of the role and practice of the CRNA.
  9. Evaluate how public policy-making strategies impact the financing and delivery of healthcare.
  10. Advocate for health policy change to improve patient care.
  11. Advocate for health policy change to advance the specialty of nurse anesthesia.
  12. Analyze strategies to improve patient outcomes and quality of care.
  13. Analyze health outcomes in a variety of populations.
  14. Analyze health outcomes in a variety of clinical settings.
  15. Analyze health outcomes in a variety of systems.
  16. Disseminate research evidence.
  17. Use information systems/technology to support and improve patient care.
  18. Use information systems/technology to support and improve healthcare systems.
  19. Analyze business practices encountered in nurse anesthesia delivery settings.

Course Numbering System

Courses numbered 60000 or above are graduate level. The first two numbers, 60, are standard in all courses. The third number indicates which semester in the sequenced program the course is placed (for example a 3 indicates the course is in the third semester). The summer sessions are numbered separately; there are nine semesters in the program. In didactic courses the fourth number has no significance. In clinical residency courses the fourth number indicates whether the course is a residency (an 8) or a concepts course (a 7). The last number indicates the number of credit hours.

DNP-A Curriculum

Minimum coursework requirements are as follows:

Degree Requirements

Spring I or Summer I

NRAN 81153Emerging Sciences, Complexity & Innovation in Health Care

3

NRAN 81123Biostatistics for the Advanced Health Practitioner

3

Summer I or Spring I

NRAN 60113Research in Nurse Anesthesia

3

NRAN 81233Decision Science and Informatics

3

Fall I

NRAN 81243Translational Research

3

NRAN 60123Physical Science in Nurse Anesthesia

3

NRAN 60134Advanced Pharmacology

4

NRAN 60146Advanced Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathophysiology I

6

Spring II

NRAN 60235Advanced Anatomy, Physiology and Pathophysiology II

5

NRAN 60213Advanced Anatomy, Physiology and Pathophysiology III

3

NRAN 60224Pharmacology of Anesthesia Agents

4

NRAN 81443Advanced Health Assessment:Anesthesia Focus

3

Summer II (First Session)

NRAN 60316Principles of Anesthesia Practice I

6

Summer II (Second Session)

NRAN 60416Principles of Anesthesia Practice II

6

Fall II

NRAN 60572Advanced Pathophysiology and Clinical Management I

2

NRAN 88080Advanced Project

3

NRAN 60583Clinical Residency I

3

Spring III

NRAN 60672Advanced Pathophysiology and Clinical Management II

2

NRAN 88080Advanced Project

3

NRAN 60683Clinical Residency II

3

Summer III

NRAN 81353Health Care Policy and Politics

3

NRAN 60782Clinical Residency III

2

NRAN 88080Advanced Project

3

Fall III

NRAN 60972Clinical Concepts

2

NRAN 60983Clinical Residency IV

3

NRAN 88080Advanced Project

3

NRAN 81153, NRAN 81123, NRAN 60113, NRAN 81223, NRAN 81243 are online courses.

Clinical Residency (minimum 16 months)

Upon completion of the initial 20 months of the program, students must immediately enter the clinical residency, which begins in late August and lasts approximately 16 months. During this time the student's learning is built on the material covered previously and comes primarily in a clinical residency although the student also returns to the classroom on a weekly basis for extensive clinically related study. The clinical residency ends in December. The graduate receives a Doctor of Nursing Practice-Anesthesia degree and is eligible to write the National Certifying Examination (NCE) for Nurse Anesthetists administered by the National Board of Certification and Recertification of Nurse Anesthetists (NBCRNA). Graduates who successfully complete this written exam are certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs).

The clinical residency consists of administering general and regional anesthesia alongside a qualified clinical instructor (anesthesiologist or CRNA). Weekly classroom sessions are clinical conferences; journal clubs; and seminars dealing with current topics including, but not limited to, respiratory, cardiovascular, thoracic, neurosurgical, regional, obstetrical, pediatric and special areas of anesthesia. Various projects and competency examinations are required/administered throughout this phase.

Courses during clinical residency are offered in concurrent sequences. Each set, e.g., NRAN 60572 and 60583, must be taken together and successfully completed prior to beginning the next set.