2016-2017 Graduate Catalog


Musical Arts, DMA

The objective of the TCU Doctor of Musical Arts (DMA) degree in performance, piano pedagogy, composition or conducting is to develop the musician-scholar—one who displays a high level of mastery in a professional medium and is equipped with scholarly research skills. The program leading to the degree is designed to prepare musician-scholars for careers as creative artists and teachers at institutions of higher learning. Enrollment in the doctoral program is carefully monitored toward the goal of remaining highly selective and relatively small. Prospective DMA students must demonstrate the potential for both artistry and scholarship on the highest levels.

DMA Admission Requirements

To be admitted for study leading to the Doctor of Musical Arts, applicants must hold a master's degree in music or music education (or the equivalent) of at least 30 credit hours from an accredited college, university, or comparable institution, and present a GPA of at least 3.0 for all previous graduate-level work (A = 4.0). Appropriate preparation for doctoral study will vary according to the major/degree plan chosen; therefore, prospective applicants should consult with faculty in their intended major area for specific requirements and expectations.

Application to the Doctor of Musical Arts program requires students to first complete the TCU Graduate Admission Application. The TCU Graduate Admission Application is available at www.graduate.tcu.edu.

Applicants are required to submit the following:

  1. A completed application for admission to DMA graduate study.
  2. Two official transcripts of all college work. Translations must be provided for all international transcripts.
  3. Non-refundable $60 application fee.
  4. Three current letters of reference from persons qualified to comment on the applicant's academic musical achievement, teaching and/or professional experience, and potential for success in the degree program.
  5. A double-spaced typed paper of five pages or more that illustrates the applicant's best writing and research skills. A term paper completed as part of master's level work is sufficient, or the student may submit a research paper, a critical analysis or an article suitable for publication.
  6. A resume or curriculum vitae. This should include a list of concert performances, compositions, publications, and other musical accomplishments.
  7. Test scores must be sent to TCU from the testing agency: GRE (all students) and TOEFL (international students).

In addition, applicants must complete the requirements for the major field of study as described below:

  1. Performance
    1. Based on the results of pre-screening, an invitation may be extended to perform an on-campus audition/recital in the principal applied music area before a faculty committee. The performance should feature works of contrasting styles, chosen to demonstrate musicianship and technical proficiency. Memorization is encouraged for all performers; it is required in piano, strings and voice. Sight-reading may be included as part of the audition. Audition requirements vary depending upon the area of study; for specific audition requirements, applicants must contact the faculty in their intended major area.
    2. Applicants must first submit a video recording of a live performance and include a typed program (PDF preferred). These required materials are uploaded through the School of Music Web site. Complete directions are available at: www.music.tcu.edu/GRAD_admissions.asp.
  2. Composition
    1. Based on the results of pre-screening, an invitation may be extended for an on-campus interview with the composition faculty.
    2. Applicants must first submit five scores of recent works with recordings, as available. These materials should be mailed directly to the Office of Graduate Studies. Complete directions are available at: www.music.tcu.edu/GRAD_admissions.asp.
  3. Conducting
    1. Based on the results of pre-screening, an invitation may be extended to perform an on-campus audition/recital with a TCU choral or instrumental ensemble before a faculty committee. The audition will consist of a work chosen by the applicant in addition to one work assigned by the conducting faculty.
    2. Applicants must first submit a video recording of a recent ensemble performance and rehearsal conducted by the applicant.
    3. Applicants must also submit a repertoire list of all works conducted, as well as those studied in depth and prepared for conducting. These required materials are uploaded through the School of Music Web site. Complete directions are available at: www.music.tcu.edu/GRAD_admissions.asp.

Audition

Based on the results of pre-screening, an invitation may be extended to perform an on-campus audition/recital/interview in the principal applied music area before a faculty committee. Applicants should not select an audition day until they have received an official invitation to do so. If invited, the audition/recital/interview should be arranged in coordination with the faculty in the major area and the College of Fine Arts Graduate Office. The CFA Graduate Office will send faculty contact information after application materials are received. Audition dates are posted on www.cfagraduate.tcu.edu/.

The candidate must present a dossier at the audition; it should include the audition program, a vita and a repertoire list. During the audition, which will be heard by at least three members of the graduate faculty, the candidate normally performs 30-45 minutes from a prepared one-hour program. After the performance, the applicant will interview with the faculty present. The faculty will report their evaluation of the audition and interview to the College of Fine Arts Graduate Office, using the Report of DMA Audition Form. This report will be added to the student's file, which will be reviewed by area faculty, the Graduate Standards Committee, the School of Music director and the associate dean for graduate Studies.

Language Requirement

The student must acquire a reading knowledge of one approved modern foreign language, usually French, German or Italian. With the consultation and approval of the program adviser, the student will choose the language most appropriate to his/her research, area of concentration and prior language study.

The student may meet the language requirement by earning at least a "B" average in the undergraduate sophomore year (both semesters) of the language, by earning a "B" in a graduate-level course in the language, or by achieving an appropriate score on a language exam such as the College Level Examination Program (CLEP). Curricular DMA credit is not given for language courses; in addition, no graduate financial aid is available for these courses.

Further language and diction skills are required for voice and choral conducting students. Please consult with the faculty in these areas for details.

Entrance Examination

The academic and musical abilities of all applicants are assessed by means of an entrance examination. This exam is given during the audition/interview visit. The exam serves as a diagnostic tool to determine whether or not a student is prepared for doctoral study, what deficiencies exist and as an aid in advising. The results of the exam are reported to the College of Fine Arts Graduate Office and added to the student's file; it is a factor in admissions.

On the basis of the entrance exam, incoming doctoral students may be advised to take certain courses to eliminate deficiencies in music history and theory. Credit earned in the completion of these courses is not applicable toward DMA requirements.

During the registration period, the student will meet with his/her program adviser to discuss the results of the exams, plan a tentative course of study, identify ways to strengthen areas in which deficiencies may exist and review general program requirements.

Students whose master's degree program did not include a course in bibliographic research will be required to take MUSI 60103 Bibliography and Research Techniques; this course will not count toward DMA curriculum requirements.

Further information about the entrance exam and suggestions for preparation are available at www.cfagraduate.tcu.edu/.

English Requirements for International Applicants

In order to be considered for admission to the TCU DMA Program, all international students must complete the Test of English as a Foreign Language and achieve one of the following scores:

  • 100 on the iBT TOEFL

This requirement applies to prospective international students coming from abroad, as well as those coming to TCU from another college or university in the United States. Official scores must be sent to TCU from the testing agency.

Students who have earned a degree (in music) at an English-language university may be exempted from taking the TOEFL, at the discretion of the Graduate Standards Committee.

The on-campus interview and submitted writing samples will also be used to evaluate each applicant's English language proficiency. International students may be asked to interview via teleconference to ascertain listening and speaking ability in English.

GRE

The GRE is required of all DMA applicants. Official scores must be sent to TCU from the testing agency. The GRE score is one of many elements in the applicant's file that will be considered during the admission process; there is no minimum required score.

Application Deadlines

For full consideration, applicants seeking admission to the DMA Program should complete their application by December 15 to be considered for fall matriculation.

Graduate Assistantships

Graduate assistantships are available in various areas; these assistantships provide tuition waiver, a stipend or both, and require up to 10 hours of work per week. Graduate assistants must be full-time resident students. Applicants should indicate their interest in being considered for an assistantship on the application for admission. The application must be received in the graduate office by December 15 for full consideration for the fall semester.

Generally, assistantships are for a complete academic year and are not available starting in the spring semester. Students are notified by April 15 if they have been granted an assistantship for the next academic year.

TCU adheres to the following Resolution of the Council of Graduate Schools in the United States: "Students are under no obligation to respond to offers of financial support prior to April 15; earlier deadlines for acceptance of such offers violate the intent of this Resolution. In those instances in which a student accepts an offer before April 15, and subsequently desires to withdraw that acceptance, the student may submit in writing a resignation of the appointment at any time through April 15. However, an acceptance given or left in force after April 15 commits the student not to accept another offer without first obtaining a written release from the institution to which a commitment has been made. Similarly, an offer by an institution after April 15 is conditional on presentation by the student of the written release from any previously accepted offer."

Doctoral students may hold an assistantship for a maximum of three years; renewal is dependent upon the recommendation of the faculty. In order to have an assistantship renewed, the student must make excellent academic and musical progress, display professional and collegial conduct, and fulfill all assistantship duties.

Outside employment for students holding financial aid carrying stipends is discouraged. The University assumes that the student's primary obligation is toward graduate study. The director and associate dean reserve the right to review any outside employment and require that the student modify the commitment to the outside employment or relinquish the financial aid appointment.

DMA Keyboard Proficiency

Certain areas of study require keyboard proficiency. These standards are as follows:

Composition Keyboard sight reading for composition majors consists of simple four-part, open choral score reading and a demonstrated ability to sight-read multiple lines at a time from a full orchestral or band score at pitch and in common transpositions (F, E-flat, B-flat, A) and tenor or alto clefs. The selected excerpts, which require moderate piano technical skills, must be transposed to the proper key and sounding octave.

Voice (Vocal Performance): Perform a piano audition of approximately five minutes in length. Repertoire presented should be equivalent in difficulty to that of Clementi Sonatinas or J. S. Bach Two Part Inventions. Pieces need not be memorized. Sight-read song accompaniments of moderate difficulty.

Choral Conducting: Sight reading for choral conducting majors consists of four-part, open choral score reading.

Wind Instrument Conducting: Sight read lines from a full orchestral or band score in common transpositions (F, E-flat, B-flat, A) and tenor or alto clefs. The selected excerpts, which require moderate piano technical skills, must be transposed to the proper key and sounding octave.

Orchestral Conducting: Two excerpts will be given to the student 24 hours prior to the exam, including four-part strings and four to five woodwinds and/or brass, including at least two transpositions. Two additional excerpts will be given at the exam, including a single line in alto or tenor clef, and a single line in B-flat, F, or A transposition.

The student's level will be ascertained by means of an audition; the required skills must be acquired be for candidacy.

DMA Program Specifics

Major and Co-Major Professor

At the time of admission, each student is assigned a faculty member—typically the student's professor in the major area—who serves as adviser and mentor throughout the program. If the major professor does not have an earned doctorate, a co-major professor with an earned doctorate will be appointed. The major and co-major professor advise the student on all matters pertaining to the program of study and selection of courses.

The major or co-major professor typically serve as chair of the student's Doctoral Committee, guiding the preparation of recitals and research for the document or dissertation. The major or co-major professor chair the oral portion of the general exam as well as the final oral examination.

Doctoral Committee

Each student is counseled by a Doctoral Committee comprising five members of the graduate faculty. As soon as it is practical, the Doctoral Committee is selected jointly by the student and the major professor. The student contacts members of the faculty to secure their willingness to serve on the committee and obtains the signature of each member on the Appointment of Doctoral Committee Form. The committee must include the major or co-major professor (who serves as chair of the committee), another professor representing the major field of study, an approved professor representing music history/literature, an approved professor representing music theory, and a professor from outside of the School of Music.

The committee approves recital programs, evaluates the recitals, conducts the general examination, supervises the preparation of the document or dissertation, and administers the final oral examination. At the document or dissertation stage, the Doctoral Committee may be reconstituted to provide additional expertise appropriate to the project. Any changes in membership of the Doctoral Committee must receive approval by the retiring, continuing and new members of the committee, the School of Music director and the associate dean for graduate Studies.

Doctoral Committee Report

The Doctoral Committee Report affords the opportunity for a thorough review of the student's degree progress. Following approval by the major area of study, it is normally prepared jointly by the major professor and student when the student has earned at least 12, but not more than 30 doctoral credits. It is then circulated to all Doctoral Committee members for approval and/or recommendations.

The report specifies the requirements for the completion of the degree and thus constitutes an agreement between the student, Doctoral Committee, the School of Music and the College of Fine Arts Graduate Office. It must be submitted to and accepted by the College of Fine Arts Graduate Office prior to attempting the general examination. Subsequent changes in the content of the report can be made only with the approval of the major professor, Doctoral Committee, School of Music director and the associate dean for graduate studies.

Residency Requirements

The student must be in residence as a full-time student for two consecutive regular semesters (fall/spring or spring/fall). A minimum of nine hours of approved coursework and/or approved research must be completed each semester of the year of residence. Depending on the area of study, summer study/coursework may or may not be available. Summer coursework does not count toward residency requirements.

Transfer Credit

All TCU DMA programs include 60 semester hours of credit. A master's degree of at least 30 hours is a prerequisite for DMA study at TCU.

Up to 12 semester hours of transfer credit earned beyond the master's level may be applied to doctoral degree requirements in accordance with the following rules:

  1. The credit hours transferred must represent valid graduate credit from an institution accredited to offer the DMA or equivalent degree.
  2. The credit is applicable to the degree program and is approved by the program adviser, the Doctoral Committee, School of Music director and associate dean for graduate studies.
  3. The credit hours transferred may not be in an area where a deficiency exists (as identified by the entrance examinations or any other evaluation process).
  4. Credit hours in the candidate's major area of concentration may not be transferred.
  5. Credit hours transferred must carry a grade of "A," "B" or "S."
  6. Credit hours transferred normally cannot be more than five years old at the time of admission or readmission to the degree program.
  7. Students whose master's degree program included more than 30 hours may be eligible to transfer up to six hours of master's degree work.

DMA Public Performance Requirements

The program content for DMA recitals must be approved one month in advance by the major professor and the student's Doctoral Committee. In the case of a lecture recital, an outline of the lecture must accompany the program. The first recital must be presented before the general examination is taken, and at least one recital must be performed after the general examination has been passed.

Recital dates may be reserved during the first week of class during each semester. The recital program must be approved by the major professor and the Doctoral Committee; the major professor will notify the College of Fine Arts Graduate Office and the Music Office that the student has been approved to play a DMA recital. The major professor will accompany the student to the Music Office to secure a date for the recital. All members of the Doctoral Committee should be notified of the time, date and location of each recital by the candidate at least two weeks prior to the performance. Students are encouraged to consult with committee members prior to setting the recital date.

Normally, all doctoral recitals are given on campus. However, with permission of the student's Doctoral Committee and the School of Music director, a student may present one of the recitals off campus. When a recital is given off campus, the major professor must be in attendance.

Ideally, all doctoral recitals will be heard in person by at least three members of the student's Doctoral Committee. Members of the Doctoral Committee present at the recital will meet privately following the recital to discuss and evaluate the performance. Doctoral Committee members not in attendance must be provided a recording by the student within one week following the recital, to be evaluated within the period of two weeks. The major professor will circulate the Report of DMA Recital Grade Form for all Doctoral Committee members to sign and return it to the College of Fine Arts Graduate Office. The associate dean will then report the recital grade to the registrar.

Performance: A minimum of three public performances is required. At least two performances must be full-length solo recitals. The remaining performance may be either a lecture recital or chamber music recital. A student who has an opportunity to perform a concerto with orchestra or appear in a major operatic role may apply for evaluation of such performances as a portion of the recital requirements. Concerto or operatic performances may not be substituted for more than one full-length recital. Such substitution must be approved in advance by the student's Doctoral Committee. Memorization requirements are determined by the faculty in the major area. A DVD may be required by some programs/areas.

Piano Pedagogy: A student emphasizing piano pedagogy must demonstrate competence both as a performer and as a teacher. To this end, three public performances are required:

  1. A full-length solo recital;
  2. A second full-length solo recital, a lecture recital (which may be pedagogical in nature), or a chamber music recital in which the piano plays an important musical role; and
  3. A public workshop for piano teachers concentrating on teaching techniques and materials. The public workshop must be at least five hours in length. It may be presented off campus, provided the major professor is in attendance and the workshop is videotaped.

Composition: A student in composition must demonstrate competence as a practitioner of the musical art by presenting two recitals. One recital is a program of original music. The second recital requirement may be satisfied through the presentation of a single recital of original music or the equivalent realized through several performances of original compositions presented during regular School of Music concerts or recital programs. As appropriate, the student may appear as a soloist, member of a chamber ensemble or as conductor. A student who has the opportunity for a significant off-campus performance of original music may apply for evaluation of that performance as a portion of the second recital requirement. This must be approved by the major professor and the Doctoral Committee.

Conducting: Three public performances are required. Two of these may be performed by TCU School of Music ensembles; at least one recital must be performed by a group recruited by the student. At least two performances must be full-length concerts. The remaining performance may be a lecture recital related to the document topic. Concert literature should comprise a variety of national and historical styles, and should make use of large as well as small ensembles. Choice of repertoire and media is made after consultation with and approval of the major professor and the Doctoral Committee. Detailed and specific requirements are available from the conducting area faculty.

Recital Recording

Recitals performed in Ed Landreth Hall or PepsiCo Recital Hall will be recorded by School of Music staff. The student must arrange for a professional-quality recording to be made of any recitals given outside the School of Music or off campus. An appropriately labeled and indexed recording of each recital, with program, must be submitted to the Graduate Office.

DMA General Examination

The general examination is designed to evaluate the student's ability to integrate knowledge, apply theoretical concepts, demonstrate skills and draw conclusions. Although it is composed of many parts, the examination is regarded as one entity and evaluated as such. It normally covers coursework completed for the doctoral degree as well as general musical knowledge normally acquired through prior study and professional experience. It focuses on the major field of concentration' the cognate area(s) of study, music history; and music theory.

Before taking the examination, the student must have remedied any deficiencies identified by the entrance exam. In addition, he/she must have completed all of the coursework in music history and theory, and a majority of the major field coursework. Further, the student must have presented at least two DMA recitals. The student must receive the approval of the Doctoral Committee to take the examination. The major professor will report to the College of Fine Arts Graduate Office in writing or by email that the student has been approved by the committee to take the exam. The student must be enrolled in at least one graduate credit hour during the semester in which the general examination is taken. The examination is both written and oral in nature. The written portion of the examination is given once each semester. Exam dates and information about the structure of the exam may be obtained from www.cfagraduate.tc.edu/.

The oral portion of the exam is usually scheduled one to two weeks following the written tests. All members of the Doctoral Committee, including the outside member, must be present when the oral portion of the examination is administered. The examination must be completed at least seven months prior to receiving the degree.

Within one week after the oral portion of the general examination, the major professor must report to the associate dean for graduate studies whether the student passed or failed the examination. If the student passes the examination, he/she is admitted to candidacy for the degree. If the student fails, he/she may, with the permission of the Doctoral Committee, attempt the examination one more time during the following semester or later. A third attempt is not permitted.

For more detailed information on how to schedule the general examination, see www.cfagraduate.tcu.edu/.

DMA Written Documentation/Dissertation

A six-credit hour written document is required for the DMA in Performance, Piano Pedagogy and Conducting. The document is normally more limited in scope than a dissertation, but demonstrates high standards of scholarship and contributes to existing knowledge. It is hoped that the final project is suitable for publication.

Composition students produce a full 12-hour dissertation of one or more compositions suitable for publication.

Students should begin thinking about a topic early during the coursework so they may be ready to present the topic proposal as soon as the general examination has been passed. Presentation of a topic prior to passing the general examination requires special permission from the Doctoral Committee and the School of Music director.

Choosing a Topic

Performance Major: The document is normally concerned with such areas as music history, repertoire, performance practices, analysis of major works, human physiology, acoustics, psychology, aesthetics, teaching methods and materials, and the editing of lesser-known compositions.

Composition Major: The final project comprises one or more major works.

Conducting Major: The document is concerned with such areas as performance practices, teaching methods and materials, the editing of early music, aesthetics or psychology, and analysis of major works.

Proposal

Once a potential topic is identified, a written proposal is prepared under the guidance of the major professor and other members of the Doctoral Committee. The proposal normally includes an introduction, a discourse on the nature and importance of the topic, a chapter-by-chapter outline of the projected document and a bibliography. Once the proposal is written, it is submitted to all committee members for comments and suggestions. Following further revision (if needed), the proposal is considered at a meeting of the entire Doctoral Committee. The student is required to be present at this meeting. Upon approval of the proposal, bound copies are then signed by the Doctoral Committee members. Each committee member receives a copy of the proposal and an additional copy is submitted to the College of Fine Arts Graduate Office for reference. The latter must be velo bound.

Document or Dissertation Hours Enrollment

Permission to enroll in MUSI 90960/ MUSI 90970 (DMA Document) or MUSI 90980/MUSI 90990 (DMA Composition Dissertation) may be granted during any enrollment period in which work on the project or proposal is undertaken. Following the initial enrollment in document or dissertation hours, a student must maintain continuous enrollment during each regular semester in at least one hour of document or dissertation until the degree is completed.

Document or Dissertation Writing

During the research and writing of the project, the candidate is advised to consult regularly with the major professor and, from time to time, with the other members of the Doctoral Committee. The major professor bears the primary responsibility for guiding the research efforts of the doctoral candidate and should possess expertise in the topic area as well as skills of scholarship necessary to guide the document to successful completion. When the topic extends beyond the expertise of this faculty member, a co-major professor may serve the best interests of the student. In addition, if the student's major professor does not have an earned doctorate, the co-major professor, appointed at the outset of doctoral study, will mentor the project. (See above, Major and Co-Major Professor.) The major or co-major professor supervises the project to ensure exhaustive research of the topic, a thorough and complete report of the findings, a logical organization of the paper, correct grammar, proper spelling, acceptable writing style and appropriate format. Before other members of the Doctoral Committee receive the document for review (either in part or whole), the paper should be at a stage of progress and level of scholarship suitable for critical examination.

Each committee member brings his/her own area of expertise to bear on the paper and carefully scrutinizes it for weaknesses in research, content, organization and general scholarship.

The student, in consultation with the major professor, will use the current edition of either the MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing or Turabian's Manual of Style. Each student must follow the School of Music DMA Document and Dissertation Guidelines available at www.cfagraduate.tcu.edu.

DMA Final Oral Examination

One month prior to the proposed final oral examination date, the candidate must present a copy of the document or dissertation to all members of the doctoral committee for critical examination and comment. All five members of the committee must read the document/dissertation and accept or reject it. If it receives tentative acceptance from the committee and the indicated corrections and/or revisions are minimal, then the candidate may begin preparation of the final draft.

The candidate must present to the Graduate Office an unbound copy of the complete document/dissertation and abstract (the latter not exceeding 350 words) in order to secure permission to take the final oral examination. The document and abstract must be accompanied by the Doctoral Oral Exam Scheduling Form, signed by all members of the Doctoral Committee. The student must contact each member of the Doctoral Committee prior to setting and confirming the date and time of the final oral examination. After the reading copy has been examined and approved and a degree check has been satisfactorily completed by the College of Fine Arts Graduate Office, the associate dean will sign the Doctoral Oral Exam Scheduling Form and the exam may take place as scheduled. A Report on the Final Oral Examination Form will be given to the major professor.

The final oral examination is primarily a defense of the document or dissertation, although any relevant topic may be explored if the committee so chooses. In order to allow adequate time for preparation of examination questions, a copy of the document should be provided to each member of the committee at least seven days prior to the examination. The student is responsible for contacting all committee members prior to setting the time, date and location of the examination. The final oral examination is open to the public.

At least four members of the committee, including the major professor and the outside member, must be present to conduct the examination. Following a decision on the student's examination performance, those committee members present must sign the Report on the Final Oral Examination Form. The major professor will deliver the report to the College of Fine Arts Graduate Office.

The candidate must be enrolled in at least one graduate hour during the semester in which the final oral examination is taken. The final oral exam must be taken during the same semester that the document or dissertation is completed.

If the candidate fails the oral exam, only one reexamination will be permitted; the date of the reexamination is set at the discretion of the doctoral committee. If the candidate fails the reexamination, he/she is dropped from the program, and candidacy for the degree is terminated.

If the candidate passes the final oral examination, he/she will take a copy of the document/dissertation, signed by all committee members, to the College of Fine Arts Graduate Office for final approval. The process requires electronic submission of a PDF file, according to the instructions posted at lib.tcu.edu/NDLTD. Copyright may be obtained; the fee for this optional service is paid by the student. The School of Music also requires a bound copy of the document/dissertation for its archives.

Time Limit

A doctoral student who enters the TCU DMA program with a master's degree must pass the general examination within four calendar years of the student's first registration for doctoral study at TCU. A doctoral candidate must complete all the degree requirements within six years after passing the general examination. Extension of time must be applied for in writing to the School of Music director, who will then make a recommendation to the associate dean. The letter should explain why the degree was not completed within the time limit and should present a schedule for completion of the degree.

DMA Music Degree Program Requirements

Performance with Cognate in Music Theory or History

MUSP 70110-70610Lessons on major instrument

18

MUSP 80971DMA Recital I

1

MUSP 80981DMA Recital II

1

MUSP 80991DMA Recital III

1

Music Theory Courses

9

Music History Courses

9

Cognate

6

MUSI 60010-60360Ensembles

2

MUSI 90970DMA Document

6

Electives

7

Total Credit Hours:60

* Six additional credits in music history or theory

MUSP 70110-70610: six semesters

Performance with Cognate in Composition

MUSP 70110-70610Lessons on major instrument

18

MUSP 80971DMA Recital I

1

MUSP 80981DMA Recital II

1

MUSP 80991DMA Recital III

1

Music Theory Courses

9

Music History Courses

9

MUSI 60630Composition

6

MUSI 60801Composition Seminar

1

Composition Electives

2

MUSI 60010-60360Ensembles

2

MUSI 90970DMA Document

6

Electives

4

Total Credit Hours:60

*Admission to the composition cognate is determined by the composition faculty; ability to do graduate-level work in composition is a prerequisite.

MUSP 70110-70610: six semesters

Performance with Cognate in Voice Pedagogy

MUSP 70110Doctoral Voice

12

MUSP 70110Doctoral Voice (Vocal Coaching)

6

MUSP 80961DMA Lecture Recital

1

MUSP 80971DMA Recital I

1

MUSP 80981DMA Recital II

1

Ensembles-Opera

2

MUSI 60064Advanced Vocal Pedagogy Seminar

4

MUSI 60072Technology in Voice Teaching

2

MUSI 60052Voice Repertoire Management

2

MUSI 60041Voice Pedagogy Practicum

1

MUSI 60041Voice Pedagogy Practicum

1

Pedagogy Elective

2-3

Music-History-Courses

6-9

Music-Theory-Courses

6-9

MUSI 90970DMA Document

6

Electives

4-5

Total Credit Hours:60

*Advanced courses in music theory and music history with a minimum of two courses in an area.

Pedagogy Electives is chosen from MUSI 50063, MUSI 60041, MUSI 60062, MUSI 60016 or speech communications disorders courses.

MUSI 70110: 6 semesters each

Piano Performance with Cognate in Piano Pedagogy

MUSP 70210Doctoral Piano

18

MUSP 80971DMA Recital I

1

MUSP 80981DMA Recital II

1

MUSP 80961DMA Lecture Recital

1

Piano Pedagogy Courses

11-12

Music Theory Courses

9

Music History Courses

9

MUSI 60080-60170Ensembles

2

MUSI 90970DMA Document

6

Electives

1-2

Total Credit Hours:60

Piano Pedagogy courses are chosen from MUSI 60203, MUSI 60213, MUSI 60223, MUSI 60233, MUSI 60243, MUSI 60913, MUSI 60923, MUSI 61230, MUSI 60400

MUSI 70210: six semesters

Piano Pedagogy DMA Requirements

MUSP 70210Doctoral Piano

12

MUSP 80971DMA Recital I

1

MUSP 80981DMA Recital II

1

MUSI 80971Doctoral Pedagogy Workshop I

1

MUSI 80981Doctoral Pedagogy Workshop II

1

Piano Pedagogy courses

12-14

Music Theory Courses

9

Music History Courses

9

MUSI 60080-60170Ensembles

2

MUSI 90970DMA Document

6

Electives

4-6

Total Credit Hours:60

Piano Pedagogy Courses are chosen from MUSI 60203, MUSI 60213, MUSI 60223, MUSI 60233, MUSI 60243, MUSI 60913, MUSI 60923, MUSI 61230, MUSI 60400

MUSI 70210: six semesters

Composition with Cognate in Music History

MUSI 70630Doctoral Composition

12

MUSP 80971DMA Recital I

1

MUSP 80981DMA Recital II

1

MUSI 60801Composition Seminar

1

Music Theory Courses

12

MUSI 70903Music Theory Treatise

3

Music History Cognate

15

MUSI 60010-60360Ensembles

1

MUSI 90980DMA Composition Dissertation

6

MUSI 90990DMA Composition Dissertation

6

Electives

2

Total Credit Hours:60

Music Theory Courses/Treatise-All DMA degrees in composition include the equivalent of a cognate in music theory.

MUSI 70630: four semesters

Composition with Cognate in Performance

MUSI 70630Doctoral Composition

12

MUSP 80971DMA Recital I

1

MUSP 80981DMA Recital II

1

MUSI 60801Composition Seminar

1

Music Theory Courses

12

MUSI 70903Music Theory Treatise

3

Music History Courses

9

MUSP 60110-60610Applied Music Lessons

6

Performance Electives

2

MUSI 60010-60360Ensembles

1

MUSI 90980DMA Composition Dissertation

6

MUSI 90990DMA Composition Dissertation

6

Total Credit Hours:60

Admission to the performance cognate is by audition and must be approved by the appropriate applied music faculty.

Music Theory Courses/Treatise-All DMA degrees in composition include the equivalent of a cognate in music theory.

MUSI 70630: four semesters

Conducting with Cognate in Music History or Theory

MUSI 70220Doctoral Conducting

18

MUSP 80971DMA Recital I

1

MUSP 80981DMA Recital II

1

MUSP 80991DMA Recital III

1

MUSI 60232Score Reading

2

Music History Courses

9

Music Theory Courses

9

Cognate

6

MUSI 60010-60360Ensembles

2

MUSI 90970DMA Document

6

Electives

5

Total Credit Hours:60

MUSI 70220 must include lessons in orchestral, band and choral conducting.

Music Theory Courses must include MUSI 70203 Analysis for Performance and MUSI 50970 Special. Studies: Advanced Orchestration.

Music History Courses- MUSI 50403 Symphonic Literature, MUSI 50423 Choral Literature, MUSI 50970 Special Studies: Band Literature are required.

Cognate-Six additional credits in music history or theory

MUSI 70220:six semesters

Conducting with Cognate in Performance

MUSI 70220Doctoral Conducting

18

MUSP 80971DMA Recital I

1

MUSP 80981DMA Recital II

1

MUSP 80991DMA Recital III

1

MUSI 60232Score Reading

2

Music Theory Courses

9

Music History Courses

9

MUSP 60110-60610Applied Music Lessons

6

MUSP 70971Recital I

1

MUSI 60010-60360Ensembles

2

MUSI 90970DMA Document

6

Electives

4

Total Credit Hours:60

Admission to the performance cognate is by audition and must be approved by the appropriate applied music faculty.

MUSI 70220 must include lessons in orchestral, band and choral conducting.

Music Theory Courses must include MUSI 70203 Analysis for Performance and MUSI 50970 Special. Studies: Advanced Orchestration.

Music History Courses- MUSI 50403 Symphonic Literature, MUSI 50423 Choral Literature, MUSI 50970 Special Studies: Band Literature are required.

MUSI 70220: six semesters